CANDY IN CRACKERS – RARE PHOTOGRAPHIC PRINTS BY ARTHUR STEEL

‘CANDY IN CRACKERS’ – OLYMPIA, WEST KENSINGTON, LONDON, 1978

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IMPORTANT NOTES:

THIS IMAGE HAS NEVER BEEN OFFERED IN PRINT FORM BEFORE. IMAGE UNEARTHED JANUARY 2013

THE WATERMARK AND THE SIGNATURE ON THE IMAGE WILL NOT BE PRESENT ON AN ORIGINAL PRINT

DESCRIPTION: ‘CANDY’ THE YORKSHIRE TERRIER, DRESSED IN CRACKERS, HELD IN ONE HAND BY IT’S OWNER

CRUFTS DOG SHOW, OLYMPIA, WEST KENSINGTON, LONDON

YEAR: 1978

COLLECTION: PLATINUM

Crufts was named after its founder, Charles Cruft, who worked as general manager for a dog biscuit manufacturer, travelling to dog shows both in the United Kingdom and internationally, which allowed him to establish contacts and understand the need for higher standards for dog shows. In 1886, Cruft’s first dog show, billed as the “First Great Terrier Show”, had 57 classes and 600 entries. The first show named “Crufts”—”Cruft’s Greatest Dog Show”—was held at the Royal Agricultural Hall, Islington, in 1891. It was the first at which all breeds were invited to compete, with around 2,000 dogs and almost 2,500 entries.

With the close of the 19th century, entries had risen to over 3,000, including royal patronage from various European countries and Russia. The show continued annually and gained popularity each year until Charles’ death in 1938. His widow ran the show for four years until she felt unable to do so due to its high demands of time and effort. To ensure the future and reputation of the show (and, of course, her husband’s work), she sold it to The Kennel Club.

In 1936, “The Jubilee Show” had 10,650 entries with the number of breeds totalling 80. The 1948 show was the first to be held under the new owner and was held at Olympia in London, where it continued to gain popularity with each passing year. The first Obedience Championships were held in 1955. In 1959, despite an increase in entrance fees, the show set a new world record with 13,211 entrants. By 1979, the show had to be moved to Earls Court exhibition centre as the increasing amount of entries and spectators had outgrown the capacity of its previous venue. Soon, the show had to be changed again—the duration had to be increased to three days in 1982, then again in 1987 to four days as the popularity continued to increase. Since 1991, the show has been held in the National Exhibition Centre, Birmingham, the first time the show had moved out of London since its inception. It was also at the Centenary celebrations in 1991 that Crufts was officially recognised by the Guinness Book of Records as the world’s largest dog show with 22,973 dogs being exhibited in conformation classes that year. Including agility and other events, it is estimated that an average 28,000 dogs take part in Crufts each year, with an estimated 160,000 human visitors attending the show.

 

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